Circumzenithal Arc

Circumzenithal Arc

Damsel got this shot of this rare Circumzenithal Arc over Arizona this morning. She was sleeping when I saw one in January of 2014 and today she managed to get this shot directly overhead.

I missed seeing it, but when I downloaded from her Canon camera this afternoon, I recognized the phenomenon. Glad that she got to see one of these. Very nice.

Click on the image to enlarge.

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Thanksgiving 2016

Thanksgiving 2016

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and enjoy a great long weekend. It’s a beautiful desert afternoon and that is one of the many blessings for which we are thankful on this day.

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Bottle Brush Shrubs

Bottle Brush

We purchased these Bottle Brush shrubs last spring from a local (overpriced) nursery to replace the Cleveland Sage shrubs that had a propensity to partially die and then grow partially back. Very ugly in the courtyard. But now, the new shrubs have green foliage and are making red flowers just in time for the Christmas season. These have already attracted bees and hummingbirds and a few of the remaining butterflies.

Once these shrubs have established themselves, they should expand to about the same size as the old sage bushes, but seem to be considerably less messy and less work to keep them pruned to a size appropriate to the courtyard environment. Click on the image to enlarge.

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Supermoon over Wickenburg

Supermoon

We drove from our camping spot in K-Stan back home today. Safe arrival with light traffic and no incidents other than a little roadwork enroute. It was a good trip to see the Grandson and his folks.

I snapped this photo of the Supermoon (Luna at perigee) shortly after moonrise this evening. Camera Canon EOS Rebel SL1 with 75-300 mm zoom lens. Settings: 1/500 sec, F8, focal length 300mm, ISO 800 and no tripod. Click on the image to enlarge.

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Camping in the ‘Stan

Campsite in Palm Desert

We are at our campsite in Palm Desert this evening. We already visited with the family who dropped by for a couple of hours. They will be back tomorrow for a BBQ here in the RV park. The highlight of tonight’s visit is the grandson is now walking on his own at fifteen months (finally).

The other interesting thing is the snowbird phenomenon that we have in the Arizona desert is also here in the K-stan desert. The park is nearly packed in contrast to our summer visits here when we have our pick of available parking sites with only a few hearty summertime visitors with whom to compete.

We plan to be here until our departure on Monday. Click on the image to enlarge.

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Second Spring in the Desert

Butterfly on Rosemary Flower

Many of the flowers are gone this late in the season, but the rosemary bushes we planted five years ago along the RV Drive still have their tiny blue flowers. This butterfly was kind enough to pose while this photo was taken a couple of days ago. Click on the image to enlarge.

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Forty Years Plus of Climate Change Alarmism

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Joe Bastardi, writing in The Patriot Post reminds us of the perpetual misinterpretation of weather phenomena by the media and other Greenbats. This article discusses the tendency of alarmists to blame any and all weather phenomena on anthropogenic activity. Forty years ago, they were discussing a new Ice Age, but as Joe notes, they want us to forget about that:

First It Was No Snow and Cold. Now It’s More Snow and Cold?

I will keep this short. The climate change (AKA global warming) alarmists are now understanding that blocking over the North Pole is the inevitable result of long-term oceanic and solar fluctuations (or at least I hope they are). However, in an effort to again push their missive (fear of a cold, snowy winter), they are pre-blaming the shift in the polar vortex on their ideas. This is rich because, in the winters of the 1970s, when it got very warm relative to average over the poles, we had people warning that an ice age was coming (of course they want you to forget that).

[Read the entire short article.]

Image: 500 millibar world chart showing relative temperatures; red is hot, violet is cold.

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